What are Venetian Masks? (with pictures) - wiseGEEK.

Masks are an important feature of the Venetian Carnival. Traditionally people were allowed to wear masks in Venice for about six months per year between the Feast of Santo Stefano (December 26) and the beginning of the Carnival season on Tuesday Shrove, but also on Ascension and from October 5 to Christmas. The origin of masks goes back to the 13th century when a document tells that the Great.

Venetian Masks Venetian masks are a centuries-old tradition of Venice, Italy. The masks are typically worn during the Carnival (Carnival of Venice), but have been used on many other occasions in the past, usually as a device for hiding the wearer's identity and social status. The mask would permit the wearer to act more freely in cases where he or she wanted to interact with other members of.

Venetian Masks: The History Hiding Behind the Masks.

The wearing of masks in Venice is a tradition which goes back as far as the 12th century, and historians speculate that it was a response to one of the most rigid class structures in all of Europe. Eventually the wearing of masks was so ubiquitous that the government had to pass laws restricting it to the Carnival season. Walking around Venice nowadays, you’ll see many types of masks.Collection of carnival Venetian masks background silhouette. Beautiful vector mask illustration isolated on white background. Elegant and ornate carnival mask with swirls and lace. Black and white. Carnival masks. Illustrated silhouette masks, as the flower pattern and ornament. Festive carnival silhouettes mask set isolated. Mask carnival celebration icon. Carnival Mask Vector illustration.Today, we will share Why Venetian Masks are they worn; Types of masks; and How they are made. Venetian masks are a very old tradition of the people in Venice. They have been around for hundreds of years and they are mostly won during the carnival of Venice. Why Venetian Masks are they worn Their function is not limited to the carnival of Venice.


The most common types of venetian masks. The Bauta mask. It is the most significant one in the history of the venetian mask: it was about hiding your own identity during the everyday life in the Repubblica di Venezia. This is a very peculiar one, a weird and mysterious character with a mask covering the whole face, with a very big jaw, and no mouth. It was worn both by men and women.Masks have always been an important feature of the Venetian carnival. Traditionally people were allowed to wear them between the festival of Santo Stefano (St. Stephen's Day, December 26) and the end of the carnival season at midnight of Shrove Tuesday.As masks were also allowed on Ascension and from October 5 to Christmas, people could spend a large portion of the year in disguise.

Venetian Carnival re-creates the fantasy of the original event with food, costumes, Venetian masks, music, Commedia Dell'Arte Theater, juggling and other spectacles. The Venetian masks and costumes are worn by people who often travel from all over the world to attend and perform (or parade) on renewed Venetian Carnival in magnificent city on the water, Venice.

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This was the earliest form of special effects in history. Masks stopped being used so frequently in Europe for a few centuries until the Renaissance period when they made a comeback. Still to this day everyone knows the Venetian Masks which were a key feature of Venice Carnival a 1000 year old celebration. This carnival laid the foundations for.

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Origin of Venetian Carnival. The Venetian Carnival is an annual celebration in Venice that starts around 10 days before Ash Wednesday and ends on Shrove Tuesday. The Carnival ends with the Christian celebration of Lent, and is world famous for the masks that the citizens of Venice use during this period. A Brief Historical Note on Venetian Carnival.

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For centuries, masks have been a way to add mystery and elegance to carnivals and balls, movies, books and everyday life. Today, we can admire them at Mardi Gras, in private collections or at exhibitions. Masks differ widely in style and coverage, but they all have the same origin: the Carnival of Venice.

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Masks indeed, were used during a great part of the year: from Saint Stephen’s day, that was the beginning of Venetian Carnival, until midnight of Mardi Gras, the last day of it. Because many Venetian nobles used to go to gamble wearing masks not to get recognize by their creditors, in 1703 masks were prohibited in all Ridotti, which was the Venetian gamble houses.

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Historical origin of the masks. The word mask comes from the Arabic word Maskharat standing for teasing or joking with a fool.Finds of masks made of stone from the year 7000 v.Chr.show us that even then masks for theater performances, art and religious rituals were used.Through a variety of cultures masks have always been means to an end, to celebrate various festivities and rituals.In this.

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Oct 9, 2018 - This Pin was discovered by Lorisa G. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.

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VENETIAN MASKS. The Venetian masks were know most notably for the Commedia dell'arte, but they were used not only during carnival.The Venetian masks were worn even in other periods of the year and for other special events. The Serenissima Republic was always quite permissive about this, even if it created a Magistrato alle Pompe in order to prevent the excesses.

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The origin of the carnival of Venice (have our ideas for your accommodation during carnival time!) comes from a feast that was usually held in February to celebrate the beginning of Spring.Than, thanks to the venetian carnival masks, it became the occasion to delete all the differences among people and to relate freely with the others. The venetians used to like it so much that in the XVIII.

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The origins of carnival and its accompanying tradition of wearing masks can be traced to Venice, Italy, starting in the 14th century. The original carnival allowed all of the classes of society in Venice to have a celebration together, as all faces were covered by masks to shield identities. Carnival festivities were banned during the reign of Mussolini, but were reinstated during a Venetian.

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